HomeBlogThe Walls Project - Art on the Belfast Peace Wall

This is a short video recently taken of a stretch of the Belfast 'Peace Wall' near the North Howard St interface. The video forms part of the Walls Project, an audiovisual examination of 'peace barriers' across the world, including the Belfast Peace Wall, the US/Mexico border and the West Bank barrier. Taking the form of an interactive website, the project will bring together footage from people living in these locations, forming a full audiovisual documentation of the barriers and the impact on the lives of those who live in their shadow.

 

This is a short video recently taken of a stretch of the Belfast 'Peace Wall' near the North Howard St interface, taken when visiting local community group the Upper Springfield Development Trust, who regularly run cross-community artistic events at the interface point itself.. The video forms part of the Walls Project, an audiovisual examination of 'peace barriers' across the world, including the Belfast Peace Wall, the US/Mexico border and the West Bank barrier. Taking the form of an interactive website, the project will bring together footage from people living in these locations, forming a full audiovisual documentation of the barriers and the impact on the lives of those who live in their shadow.

The Belfast peace walls (or peace lines) were built in 1969 at the outbreak of the Northern Ireland Troubles, with the intention of separating Catholic and Protestant communities in an effort to stem violence between the two. Though only originally intended to be in place for six months, the walls are still in place though recent statements have indicated plans for them to come down by the year 2023. As you can see here, the walls themselves have become a medium for street art. Along this stretch of the wall, graffiti and sanctioned artworks are side-by-side; much of the artwork seen here forms part of the recent Greater Shankill Partnership If Walls Could Talk project, in which artists created works on the wall itself, through which, they say, they 'are replacing negative with creative energy'. This is one such image created by artists John Johnston and David Craig, a mural that 'internationalises' the Belfast Wall.

The material gathered for Walls Project, and the website itself, will feed into a large-scale multimedia musical theatre piece by composer Andrea Molino, called There Is No Why Here. This is an ambitious work that will explore 'the fundamental problem of the nature and function of human judgement', and when the traditional ways of distinguishing between right and wrong fail.

 

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